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I attempted to categorize the various usages of the phrase 'get to' for a better understanding, but got difficulties due to the scattered information. Would you be able to assist me in organizing the contexts in which 'get to' is used with both nouns and verbs? I know these meanings:

For NOUNS

  • arriving at a particular location

We need to get to the airport on time for our flight.

  • achieving a particular goal

Let's make sure we get to the meeting on time.

For VERBS

  • opportunity to do or experience something

I finally get to meet my favorite author

  • process of understanding

I'm trying to get to grips with the new software.

phrasal verbs

  • reach, arrive at

I’ll call you when I get to the railway station.

  • have an opportunity to or be allowed to

How come he gets to be hall monitor? No fair!

  • to upset or annoy

This job’s really getting to me.

  • track down and intimidate

He’s refusing to testify. I think the Mob got to him.

Could you please tell me what I missed?

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  • Is this some kind of homework assignment?
    – BillJ
    Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 6:44
  • @BillJ, Ha, no. I'm old enough. I'm doing it for my own research
    – Rodrigo
    Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 6:53
  • Old age and homework are not mutually exclusive, though :) This seems to be a request for a list, or (in a way) proofreading, which are both bad fits for this platform.
    – Joachim
    Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 7:25
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    Get to grips with is a phrasal verb, not a meaning of get to. Your first two phrasal verbs are duplicates of usages you have already mentioned. Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 7:42
  • The verb "get" can have many meanings and usages in English. I would suggest you get yourself a good dictionary. The English language has already been "categorised". No need to re-invent the wheel. For example the OED has over 130 entries for the verb "to get", in addition to over 280 entries for phrasal verbs with "get".
    – Billy Kerr
    Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 10:11

2 Answers 2

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A better classification would be:

  1. Get + prepositional phrase (get to the meeting) (get behind the wall)

This means arriving at a position or progressing towards a position.

  1. Get + infinitive (get to play tennis)

Be able or have the opportunity to do something.

  1. Get to (phrasal verb) (she's getting to me)

This means "upset or annoy"

Everything else is just an extension of those meanings, or an idiomatic use. Eg "The mob has got to the witness" means that the mob is intimidating the witness, but it is just an idiomatic extension of the idea of "arrive at a position" (the mob has arrived at his position, ie they have found the witness and are doing what gangsters do when they find a witness)

Similarly "Where has she got to?" extends the sense of "arrive at", since if she arrived somewhere in the past, that is where she is currently located. Hence this means "where is she?" with some rhetorical flourish.

And "Let's get to eating" extends the "arrive at" with a gerund/participle as the object of the preposition, meaning "arrive at the state of doing work", ie "Let's start to eat."

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    I am used to hearing 'Where has X got to?' with a 'rhetorical flourish' implying 'X is late'. Slightly stronger, 'Where can X have got to?' Commented Apr 12, 2023 at 8:34
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I think you are miscategorizing your examples. This would be my breakdown:

Arriving somewhere (with a noun)

We need to get to the airport on time for our flight.
Let's make sure we get to the meeting on time.
I’ll call you when I get to the railway station.

Achieving something (with a verb)

I finally get to meet my favorite author
How come he gets to be hall monitor? No fair!

Phrasal verb "get to" meaning "annoy"

This job’s really getting to me.

Idiom "get to grips with"

I'm trying to get to grips with the new software.

As for your last example:

He’s refusing to testify. I think the Mob got to him.

You could perhaps explain this as a combination of Arriving somewhere and annoying. Or you could just say it's another phrasal verb with a special meaning.

But you asked if you had missed anything. Perhaps this is another meaning:

You don't get to tell me what to do!

or perhaps it's just a variant of Sense 2.

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