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In my own research, complaints from women about their husbands most often focused not on tangible inequities such as having given up the chance for a career to accompany a husband to his.

Hello, ladies and gentlemen, I want to consult you how to understand the last to his in this sentence. Which grammer structure it belongs?

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    to accompany a husband to his [career]. [Which grammar structure does it belong to?]
    – Lambie
    Apr 18, 2023 at 14:11
  • @Lambie Thank you for replying, but I still feel confused. Because to my opinion, the sentence has already finished without to his: ...such as having given up the chance for a career to accompany a husband. I don't know why the to his can exists.
    – hexiaole
    Apr 18, 2023 at 14:30
  • The sentence is a bad one. It is too long, and to accompany someone in their career suggests working in the same type of work or profession. Since the hypothetical wife has given up the chance of a career, this does not make sense. Wives can, and often do, give up the chance of a career to support a husband in or with his. 'To' in 'to his' is the wrong preposition. Apr 18, 2023 at 14:58
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    It is a poor sentence. But it means what I said. tangible inequities such as having given up the chance for a career to accompany a husband on his [career]. In English, accompany takes on: We accompanied him on the trip.
    – Lambie
    Apr 18, 2023 at 15:05
  • @MichaelHarvey Thanks. You said it does not make sense when accompany...in. Does it make no sense when accompany...to either? Because in my example above, the sentence is to case.
    – hexiaole
    Apr 18, 2023 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

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The author avoided to repeat the word "career". "... having given up the chance for a career to accompany a husband to his [career]."

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