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Is it wrong to use going to with conditionals? I.e., can I say this?

If this happens, then this is going to happen.

As opposed to the natural-sounding

If this happens, then this will happen.

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    Google the phrase "going to", and one of the top results is this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Going-to_future. "Going to" and "will" are interchangeable in most instances.
    – Egghead99
    Commented Sep 15, 2014 at 18:17
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    Yes, to my ear "then this is going to happen" is quite natural sounding. I think I say that more often than just "will" especially when you include uses of gonna instead of the fully enunciated going to.
    – Jim
    Commented Sep 15, 2014 at 20:08
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    I wonder what gave you the idea that this would be wrong. (And I wonder why you feel that the example with will is more natural-sounding.)
    – Drew
    Commented Sep 16, 2014 at 1:21
  • @Drew it just seems to me that I hear this construction more (obviously, speaking from the perspective of a nonnative speaker who lives in the US). Plus, here's an example from an e-mail I got a few days ago from Google: Your AdWords account has only X USD left for ad activity. Once that's used up, your ads will stop running. If they are absolutely sure that that's going to happen, then why did they use will instead of going to?
    – user132181
    Commented Sep 16, 2014 at 8:13
  • There is nothing wrong with using will when you are sure something will happen. Dunno what gave you the idea that only going to applies in such a case. We will all die someday.
    – Drew
    Commented Sep 16, 2014 at 13:37

1 Answer 1

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They are both grammatically correct. Like Jim comments above 'going to' is more likely to be spoken. Since both constructions are correct, the ultimate meaning comes down to how it is emphasized by the speaker, and also how it is taken by the hearer. In written form, the 'will' seems a bit more emphatic.

But if I exclaimed a loud:

" ... this is going to happen!" [Tonal emphasis on the words]

it will come off much stronger than 'this will happen'. BTW, as a general phrase, we'd more likely use:

If this happens, then that will happen.

Same deal if I were to emphasize "will"...

Ok, oops now we did it! This will happen next!

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