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a. I don't know anyone who was as old as my father when he retired.

b. I don't know anyone who was as old as my father when they retired.

Could one use these sentences to say

  1. I don't know anyone who retired at a a higher age than my father.

?

(b) could mean:

I don't know anyone who was as old as my father is now when they retired.

(a) could mean:

I don't know anyone who was the same age as my father when he retired. (a somewhat strange thing to say)

But could either mean (1)?

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    I think both sentences would be understood to mean (1), although they don't express the meaning correctly. Apr 28, 2023 at 12:05

1 Answer 1

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Both sentences literally mean, "I don't know anyone who retired at an age as high (or higher) than my father's age now".

However, since it's unnatural to compare one person's retirement age with another person's age, it will be understood to mean (1) without special explanation in the context.

Your sentence (1) is a natural way to express it. The others are not.

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