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I was watching this TV series, "Unstable" on Netflix. In the 2nd episode, the CEO says to CFO, "Bring me a surprise. Make it a croissant!"

So, when I heard the first sentence, I thought the "surprise" could be anything, not only food. But in the second sentence, he mentioned a croissant. He said, however, "Make "it" a croissant." In this case, does the croissant mean something else, not the pastry?

At work, when my colleague asks the team if anyone wants some coffee or breakfast, some people answer, "Bring me a surprise". I'm confused if the word surprise in that expression is related to food or not.

Thanks for your answers, in advance!

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No, “Bring me a surprise” could mean anything, depending on context. Here, of course, the speaker is being ironic. Compare Henry Ford’s famous remark when competing manufacturers started selling various colors of cars. He said buyers of Fords could get any color they wanted, so long as it was black.

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At work, when my colleague asks the team if anyone wants some coffee or breakfast, some people answer, "Bring me a surprise".

In this context they would expect something to eat and/or drink from the same place. Anything else might indeed be a surprise, but remember that not all surprises are good.

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