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I am searching for the information about countability of class, but cannot find it.

The situation where I would like to use "math class" is like this: You are looking at your school timetable and talking about it with your friend who is new.

My questions:

  1. I heard that I can say "We have math class today." Then, can't I say "We have a math class today"? If I can, what nuance will they have? What does "math class" mean without an article?
  2. I would like to say "I like math class. I think the teacher is nice." in the situation above. But I am not sure if it is the proper way of saying it when I would like to mean that I like every math class at school, which is being lead by the teacher I like. Don't I need to say "math classes" to mean that?

I suppose "We have a math class today" means there is one math class in the day, and not two math classes. I don't understand why is sometimes "math class" uncountable.

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    Only in AmE, in BrE its maths May 2, 2023 at 14:37

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I heard that I can say "We have math class today." Then, can't I say "We have a math class today"? If I can, what nuance will they have? What does "math class" mean without an article?

You can say either. If you omit the indefinite article, then you treat "math class" as a mass noun. If you include it, then you are suggesting that there is only one instance of the class today.

The distinction is not absolutely clear, though, especially because "class" can mean either an entire course of instruction that includes many sessions or a single session of such a course. However, if one math course meets several times today, then it would be more common to omit the article. (Alternatively, you could rephrase the sentence. For example: "I have three math classes today!" "My math class meets three times today!")

I would like to say "I like math class. I think the teacher is nice." in the situation above. But I am not sure if it is the proper way of saying it when I would like to mean that I like every math class at school, which is being lead by the teacher I like. Don't I need to say "math classes" to mean that?

I'm not entirely sure about what you mean, but both versions ("math class" and "math classes") would be correct. In the first version, you treat "math class" as a mass noun. In the second you mean multiple classes, which could refer to several instances of either a single course or multiple courses. (If you do use the second version, I find it more natural to include a determiner. For example: "I like my math classes.")

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