0

in guns and roses' since I don't have you lyrics:

" don't have plans and schemes

And I don't have hopes and dreams

I don't have anything

Since I don't have you

And I don't have fond desires

And I don't have happy hours

I don't have anything

Since I don't have you

Happiness and I guess

I never will again

When you walked out on me

In walked ol' misery

And she's been here since then

Yeah, we're ****!

I don't have love to share

And I don't have one who cares

I don't have anything

Since I don't have you"

is it:

  • "Happiness and I guess I never will again" the complete sentence? or is it:

  • " Since I don't have you Happiness and I guess I never will again"

if the latter is the correct options doen't it feels non-semantic the use of "and" in the sentence?

if the former is correct option doen't it feels like an incomplete sentence?

3
  • 2
    These lyrics aren't standard English, so it's impossible to say with confidence what the intent is. I can guess that it means something like, "Since I don't have you, Happiness, and I guess I never will again", where Axl Rose is directly addressing the concept of happiness as if it's a person that he doesn't have, or as if he's talking to a real person, but calling them "Happiness" because that's what that person represents to him.
    – gotube
    Commented May 3, 2023 at 13:19
  • @gotube I had a similar thought regarding "Since I don't have you Happiness and I guess I never will again" but I still can't explain the conjunction "and" in that sentence Commented May 3, 2023 at 14:36
  • 1
    The full sentence is, "[I don't have anything since I don't have you, Happiness], and [I guess I never will again]". Does that make more sense? The "and" joins two independent clauses together, which I have marked with [brackets].
    – gotube
    Commented May 3, 2023 at 15:06

0

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .