2

I wanted to know why there is inversion in the last part of the following sentence.

Apes raised by humans seem to protect more frequently than do apes in the wild.

6
  • 4
    In comparative clauses like "do apes in the wild" in your example the subject can occur after the verb. The effect of the inversion is to place a contrastive subject in end position. It resembles a blend between subject preposing and subject-verb inversion, a property that is found only in comparative clauses.
    – BillJ
    Commented May 17, 2023 at 8:28
  • @BillJ Care to make that an answer?
    – gotube
    Commented May 17, 2023 at 16:11
  • It is merely a stylistic choice.
    – Lambie
    Commented May 17, 2023 at 16:31
  • 2
    The example's intransitive use of protect is not idiomatic, BTW. You have to protect a thing, transitive, or protect from, against, etc. One can not merely protect. Mary protects, does not work.
    – EllieK
    Commented May 17, 2023 at 16:36
  • Then research the issue! You can search for "subject-verb inversion" or a similar term. If the sources that you find don't explain why inversion is used in situations like this one, or they are not clear, then please explain in your question why you couldn't find the answer on your own. Commented May 17, 2023 at 23:49

1 Answer 1

0

Apes raised by humans seem to protect more frequently than do apes in the wild.

In comparative clauses like "do apes in the wild" in your example, the subject can occur after the verb. The effect of the inversion is to place a contrastive subject in end position.

It resembles a blend between subject preposing and subject-verb inversion, a property that is found only in comparative clauses.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .