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Context: I am a new student of a class. There is a friend, she has always helped me since I joined the class. Now I am still in the same class with her. I feel grateful and just want to say thank you to her.

(1) Me: Thank you for what you did for me, Jane. I hope that our friendship will last forever.

(2) Me: Thank you for what you have done for me, Jane. I hope that our friendship will last forever.

No matter if Jane keep helping me or not, I can use either tense. Right?

Any difference between them?

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    To me, what you did suggests that she no longer does it. Commented May 17, 2023 at 12:43
  • Have you been taught when to use the simple past and when to use the perfect? The usual rules should help you here.
    – Stuart F
    Commented May 17, 2023 at 14:49
  • @StuartF, yes, I been studying these two tense for a long time, but sometimes I still can’t grasp the difference between them. I had a post here english.stackexchange.com/questions/606897/…. I think that I can use either tense here without much difference, but I am not sure, so I want to hear more about your opinions.
    – LE123
    Commented May 17, 2023 at 14:52

1 Answer 1

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"Thank you for what you did for me" usually refers to one single action Jane did. If it indicates a series or pattern of behaviour, it's from so long ago that it feels like one single event now.

"Thank you for what you have done for me" refers to either a single event, or a series or pattern of actions, possibly continuing to the present. If the actions don't continue to the present, then the present aspect is that the action still has an effect now.

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