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According to Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expatriate,

"An expatriate (sometimes shortened to expat) is a person temporarily or permanently residing in a country other than that of the person's upbringing"

and, "In common usage, the term is often used in the context of professionals or skilled workers sent abroad by their companies,1 rather than for all 'immigrants' or 'migrant workers'. "

If a person is born and raised in England, but is now living in Canada permanently and is a citizen by naturalization, is it right to call the person a "British expat"? Looking at the Wikipedia article, it doesn't seem to be wrong but is probably not common.

What else will be a concise way to describe this person instead of "Canadian, born and raised in England"?

1

You cite:

a person temporarily or permanently residing in a country other than that of the person's upbringing

Then ask:

If a person is born and raised in England, but is now living in Canada permanently and is a citizen by naturalization, is it right to call the person a "British expat"?

So... yes. By definition.

But I'll mention a subtlety in the use of the word as I've seen it used, about people who want to suggest something negative about the country they've left. Even if that is exaggerated to be joking, and they don't actually have a problem with their home country, the word comes up when you want to emphasize you've left and don't plan on going back. It's sort of talking about your "ex-country" a bit like talking about an "ex-girlfriend".

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  • Thanks! Interesting info about the subtlety. I have cited the definition, but have also cited what is said about its usage. Which are both somewhat contradictory. – Apeksha Sep 17 '14 at 3:43

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