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ldoceonline.com:
(1) I’ve been lucky in that I have never had to worry about money.
my variant:
(2) I’ve been lucky that I have never had to worry about money.

Is (2) correct?
If not, then why not?
If it is, then what's the difference between (1) and (2)?


ldoceonline.com:
(3) Philip’s boast is that he started out without any outside financial backing.
my variant:
(4) Philip’s boast is in that he started out without any outside financial backing.

Is (4) correct?
If not, then why not?
If it is, then what's the difference between (3) and (4)?


Could you compare please "that" and "in that"?:
What is the difference between them?
When can we use only "in that"?
When can we use only "that"?
When can we use both "in that" and "that"?

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There's not really a concept of "syntactically correct" for #1 and #2 - they're both idiomatically valid (but the in version is far less common).

But for the other pair, #4 is syntactically invalid. My advice is unless you're quite sure your context is one where native speakers might use in that - mostly, when it means [specifically] because - you should stick to plain that.

Approximately, in that... = in the specific respect that...

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