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In the following context, I'm difficult to understand the bold and italic sentence.

How should I understand this sentence?

Can there be any word or verb which was omitted between the words 'feeling' and 'due to'?

Can I rephrase this as: conditioned through pleasurable feeling (which is) due to the beautiful appearance of persons or things...

I think that 'due to' stands for 'because of'.

Context:

For example, conditioned through pleasurable feeling due to the beautiful appearance of persons or things, there may arise craving for such visible objects. Or conditioned through pleasurable feeling due to pleasant food, craving for tastes may arise.

Source: P. 37 "Fundamentals of Buddhism" by Nyanatiloka Mahåthera

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    "I'm finding it difficult to understand..." Presumably this is a translation, and the sentence is rather clumsy. The author is saying that the cravings are a result of pleasurable feelings [which are] caused by/inspired by/a reaction to beauty. Commented May 23, 2023 at 10:49
  • You should be able to find "due to" in a good dictionary.
    – Stuart F
    Commented May 23, 2023 at 11:17

2 Answers 2

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You can consider 'due to' to be a direct equivalent of 'because of' or 'as a result of' just using more archaic terminology.
It's still perfectly acceptable & a common phrase.

It is also directly interchangeable with 'owing to' - possibly because this particular 'due' can also mean 'owing' in a financial sense; as in the usage, "He did the work, so pay him his due."

Merriam Webster & Collins have good explanations.

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In the given sentence:

..., conditioned through pleasurable feeling due to the beautiful appearance of persons or things, there may arise craving for such visible objects.

There is no word or verb omitted between "feeling" and "due to". The phrase "due to" indicates the cause or reason for the pleasurable feeling. You can add "which is" in front of "due to", but it can also be omitted.

You're correct that "due to" means the same as "because of", there are also other synonyms, such as "on account of", "owing to", and "as a result of".

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