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based on this short headline:

For These Veterans, ‘Free’ Health Care Is a 5-Hour Flight Away

Citizens of three Pacific Island nations, eligible to serve in the U.S. military, find it hard to make use of the health benefits they have earned.

who faces difficulty to get the free health care, Veterans or the Citizens eligible to serve in the U.S. military, as to my view they are opposite.

the Headline starts mentioning the veterans and in the middle switch to Citizens eligible to serve in the U.S. military, as someone learning english this can be bit confusing

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    A source would be helpful, but even like this it seems quite obvious some copy/paste mistake or something of the sort was made. And please format your question properly: I don't really see where the quote ends and your question continues.
    – Joachim
    May 28, 2023 at 19:21
  • No contradiction. Citizens of three Pacific Island nations who have served in the US military ('these veterans') are eligible for free medical care. May 28, 2023 at 19:49
  • @Michael Harvey, the headline states the Citizens of three Pacific Island are aligible to serve in U.S. military, not that they've served. May 28, 2023 at 19:57
  • @evanildalidantown 1. It starts with 'these veterans'. A 'veteran' in US English is a person who has served in the military. 2. The text says the health benefits they have earned. May 28, 2023 at 20:00
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    The article is saying 1. Citizens of three Pacific Island nations are eligible to serve in the US military. 2. Those of them who have served in the past are entitled to free healthcare. May 28, 2023 at 20:24

1 Answer 1

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The citizens and veterans are the same people. Being a citizen doesn't mean you've never been in the military. In fact, for many militaries, you must be a citizen of the country to be eligible to serve. The word "citizen" is sometimes used to mean "ordinary citizen", as in, someone who is not a soldier, but the most common meaning is just someone who belongs to a certain country.

This story is about three Pacific Island nations where the citizens are eligible to serve in the U.S. Military. After these citizens serve, and are veterans, they find it difficult to access the services they are entitled to.

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  • ♦, thank you very much for contributing, but don't you think at all this phraing is confusing? I mean to get the gist of "After these citizens serve, and are veterans, they find it difficult to access the services they are entitled to." was not easy for me, it was perceived naturally May 29, 2023 at 13:22
  • ♦, the citizens eligible to serve in the U.S. Military, find it difficult to access the services they have earned. but they are yet to be entitled to those benefits after serving, in the future. They don't know if it will still be difficulty to access those May 29, 2023 at 13:46
  • The reader must infer that the citizens and the veterans are the same thing, but it's not difficult to do. It's clear to me what the meaning is
    – gotube
    May 29, 2023 at 17:17
  • ♦, saying the citizens are "eligible to serve" is not a match with Veterans, right? I think the closest I got to a full interpretaion was taking into account the fact 'VA' which provides hospitals and medical care for current and former members of the military as mentioned by Michael Harvey. Don't you think it is likely the real interpretation? May 29, 2023 at 18:20

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