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Is it also possible to "make a world record"? Or just "setting" and "breaking" are possible?

I found it in a google search but found nowhere else proof of it. Could you help me out? Would a native speaker also express it with the verb "make"?

making a record - google search

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  • For this native speaker of American English, all one can do to records is set, break, and tie them. Well, that’s not quite true; one can also do things like approach, smash, obliterate, and “fall short of” them. But no, one cannot make a record. That usage is reserved for musicians in recording studios. One can do things like making a record-breaking jump. But there the thing being made is the jump. Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 10:24
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    I think making a new world record suggests doing something that has no established history of record-keeping (and breaking). For example, you apply to The Guinness Book of World Records to have your "most bumblebees standing in a straight line for 1 minute" (or whatever) recognized, authenticated, and included as the first in a new world record category. Once the first one is established, it's broken by others as they set a new record exceeding the previous title-holder's recorded value. Commented Jun 2, 2023 at 10:47

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The expression "make a (new) world record" is much less common than "set a (new) world record" and "break an (old) world record". Here is a Google Books comparison of the first two of those:

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Depending on context, you would probably be understood if you said "make a (new) world record". However, keep in mind that it may be ambiguous, because someone might think that you mean "make a new record that didn't exist before". Fumble Fingers describes the issue well in a comment above:

Making a new world record suggests doing something that has no established history of record-keeping (and breaking). For example, you apply to The Guinness Book of World Records to have your "most bumblebees standing in a straight line for 1 minute" (or whatever) recognized, authenticated, and included as the first in a new world record category.

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