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Example 1

Since the border got opened, a lot of people have been to Japan for sightseeing. However, tourists who are traveling in the country mainly stay in the capital city.

Example 2

Since the border got opened, a lot of people have been to Japan for sightseeing. However, in Japan, tourists mainly stay in the capital city.

Example 3

Since the border got opened, a lot of people have been to Japan for sightseeing. However, tourists mainly stay in the capital city.

If we already have the context, can we simplify Example 1 to Example 3?

If we already have the context, can we simplify Example 2 to Example 3?

If yes, then does that mean that in Example 3, the relative clause [who are traveling in the country] is implied, and Example 3 can also imply the phrase "in Japan"?

How do we explain this phenomenon? Does context just allow us to understand the intended meaning?

Can we say this is the economics of language?

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    (1) sounds contradictory to me. If the tourists stay mainly in Tokyo, they are not 'travelling in the country' just visiting it. (PS Better to say was opened than got opened.) Jun 8, 2023 at 13:05
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    (3) seems fine to me, as you have already established that you are talking about Japan. Jun 8, 2023 at 15:03
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    As I said, the 'tourists' mentioned in the second sentence are obviously the 'people who have been to Japan' in the first one. Being a tourist (travelling for pleasure) usually involves sightseeing, though it doesn't have to (for example, people who visit countries with a warmer climate than their own just for the beach and nightlife). Jun 8, 2023 at 15:42
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    If someone is a tourist, by definition, they are travelling in whatever country they're in, so "who are travelling in the country" is always unnecessary. Even if someone is mostly staying in one city, we still say they are "travelling". Moving from place to place isn't necessary to still be considered to be travelling. If you're a tourist, you are travelling.
    – gotube
    Jun 8, 2023 at 16:48
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    Is this a question about English? Surely it's the same in every language? Does your native language not operate in the same way?
    – Stuart F
    Jun 8, 2023 at 21:12

1 Answer 1

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Yes, example 3 would be a valid way of saying the same thing as example 1. Tourists are generally assumed to be visiting a country (especially clear in this context), and the fact that Japan is the country being visited is clear from the context established by the first sentence.

Edit: also, the fact that Tokyo is the capital of Japan is sufficiently common knowledge that the second sentence could easily be replaced with 'However, tourists mainly stay in Tokyo.' I would consider this the more natural statement, but that's of course a matter of opinion.

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