1

I read a wonderful article on this resource about the Perfect construction - Canonical Post #2: What is the perfect, and how should I use it? - and came across this part:

Adjectival participles

The economy has neither completely recovered from the global recession which struck in 2008 nor remained permanently stuck in a protracted depression.

...

Note that in one of the examples above, there are also past participles which are not part of the perfect construction—stuck and protracted. These are employed as adjectives—stuck as an adjective complement and protracted as an attributive adjective. That’s something else you have to watch out for.

Can someone clarify and provide examples of how constructions with Adjectival Participles, similar to the Perfect?

4
  • 1
    Please edit your question to include the "examples above" that contain the words "stuck" and "protracted". We can't explain how they're not perfect constructions if we can't see them. Don't expect answerers to follow links.
    – gotube
    Jun 26, 2023 at 16:36
  • 1
    @gotube Ok, done
    – Rodrigo
    Jun 26, 2023 at 16:42
  • That paragraph could be a parenthetical note or removed entirely. It's certainly doesn't belong as part of the main body of a text about the usage of perfect forms, and has nothing to do with learning about them.
    – gotube
    Jun 26, 2023 at 17:16
  • @gotube: I think you missed the point being made by StoneyB and repeated in my answer below. The OP here has mistakenly assumed the past participles "stuck" and "protracted" have some connection to Perfect verb forms in the context of StoneyB's post. Which is exactly the conflation he was advising people not to make - just because [HAVE] + [Past Participle] is called the "Perfect" form doesn't imply that [Past Participle] on its own has any particular relevance to Perfect forms. Usually they're either Simple Past, OR (as his examples) Past Participles used adjectivally Jun 26, 2023 at 19:16

1 Answer 1

1

The specific context where stuck appears in StoneyB's excellent "Canonical Post" is...

The economy has neither completely recovered from the global recession which struck in 2008 nor remained permanently stuck in a protracted depression.

There's nothing in the surrounding text about the use of stuck there being "similar to the Perfect", because it's not. It's a completely different type of verb usage, whereby the past participles stuck and protracted are used as adjectives.

Note that the primary point of that particular example is simply to point out that remained is effectively a Present Perfect usage, even though it doesn't explicitly say has remained. The has is implicit - it's an "elided" repetition of has from the third word in the utterance (alternatively, ...nor has [it] remained...).

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .