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I have been looking in dictionaries, and while the examples do provide some insight into the difference, I can't really derive definitive nuances specific to each option. What are they, if they exist?

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    We're not psychic! Tell us some of the examples, so we can rule on whether there's a difference, and if so what it might be. Offhand I can't think of any contexts where both I wish for X and I wish X could both be valid utterances, for the same value of X. Jul 15, 2023 at 18:26
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    Okay - I wish you to leave and I wish for you to leave are both valid. They mean exactly the same thing - the only difference is the second version is far less common. (And I don't like it - but obviously nor do most native speakers! :) But we'd rarely use wish there anyway. It's nearly always I want you to leave, and I want for you to leave is extremely uncommon. Jul 15, 2023 at 18:30
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    Does this answer your question? the structure "like for somebody to do something". Also "for" in "I like for you to be still" Jul 15, 2023 at 18:38
  • Another option: "I wish that [the future is rosy] ..." Jul 15, 2023 at 19:45

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