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I'd hate for you to miss the show.

Can I interpret this as so? I only want to know the correctness of the interpretation.

I would hate it if you missed the show.

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  • PLease clarify what research you have done. What other interpretations do you think it might have?
    – Colin Fine
    Aug 12, 2023 at 13:22
  • @ColinFine I want to know, only, of the correctness of the interpretation...
    – Sam
    Aug 12, 2023 at 14:17
  • I'd hate [for] X to happen = If X were to happen I would hate it = I would hate it if X were to happen. Aug 12, 2023 at 14:18

2 Answers 2

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  • I'd hate for you to miss the show.

  • I would hate it if you missed the show.

These sentences have identical meaning. The "it" in the second sentence encompasses the fact of you missing the show, which is what the "for" of the first sentence also addresses.

Grammatically, the "for you to miss the show" might be thought of as a prepositional phrase. Remember that a prepositional phrase ends in a noun or pronoun, and remember that a noun can be a person, place, thing, event, or an idea. As an "idea," the "you to miss the show" can be that noun, and that is the same idea addressed by "it" in the second sentence.

Essentially, those are two different ways of saying the same thing, with the second example substituting a dependent clause in the place of the prepositional expression of the first sentence.

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Essentially, those are two different ways of saying the same thing, with the second example substituting a dependent clause in the place of the prepositional expression of the first sentence.

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