1

Since 'ambition' and 'reality' can be either countable or uncountable, do I have to use them both countably like Sentence 1 or I can use one of them countably while the other one uncountably like Sentence 2? (I wrote the two sentence.)

In some cultures, children are often told that they can turn their ambition into a reality if they work hard enough. (I think the two bold words are both countable here)

In some cultures, children are often told that they can turn their ambitions into reality if they work hard enough. (I think I used 'ambition' countably but 'reality' uncountably. Is this okay?)

3
  • As this usage chart for turn it into [a] reality shows, both versions (with/without the article) are in common use. I don't see any scope for there being any difference in meaning - it's just an arbitrary stylistic choice. People are less likely to include the (singular) article with plural turn them into a reality, but I don't see any good reason for that. Use whichever permutations you like. Aug 14, 2023 at 12:20
  • ...it used to almost always be turn them into realities, but lately turn them into a reality has become equally common. Aug 14, 2023 at 12:26
  • @FumbleFingers, thank you! Aug 14, 2023 at 12:36

1 Answer 1

1

There is no grammatical requirement with turn X into Y that x and y have the same number. The same is true of similar constructions, as with the verb make.

I'm going to show you how to turn these ingredients into a cake.

The book says you can make your dreams a reality.

Just thought I'd make explicit what is implicit in the comments above.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .