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I am struggling between the two versions of a sentence. To be precise, I was wondering which sentence is more native-like/idiomatic? Do I really need the word also there?

A:

Changes in the coach's ideas also necessitate a change in the way players communicate during the game.

B:

Changes in the coach's ideas necessitate a change in the way players communicate during the game.

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  • Good question. If all the coach's new ideas 'necessitate a change' in communication, you don't need also. If not, it's useful. Commented Aug 20, 2023 at 20:00
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    also would typically refer to something stated previously. When a coach's ideas change, the way players communicate during the game must also change. Commented Aug 20, 2023 at 20:30
  • Impossible to answer without more (prior) context. Commented Aug 21, 2023 at 18:19

1 Answer 1

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It depends on the context.

If a previous sentence had described some result(s) of changes in the coach's ideas, you use "also" here to indicate that this is an additional consequence.

If there wasn't such a preceding sentence, "also" is optional but not required. You might use it to suggest that there are obvious consequences that are unstated, and you're adding a non-obvious result.

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