2

which one of these sentences is more suitable, if I need to use one of them in a self-introduction?

I think both are fine as in the first we emphasize the duration and in the second the result.

For the last year I was working as a manager. But now I'm not.

For the last year I had worked as a manager. But now I'm not.

3
  • Can you explain your concern here? Why do you doubt the grammar in these sentences?
    – James K
    Aug 22, 2023 at 7:54
  • I think both are fine as in the first we emphasize the duration and in the second the result. But if I need to use one of these sentences in self introduction which one is more suitable?
    – Roro
    Aug 22, 2023 at 8:01
  • There's no justification whatsoever for using Past Perfect in the final example, because nothing else in the utterance suggests a time in the past earlier than some other time in the past. It would at least be justifiable (but probably still not a good idea) to use Past Perfect if the context had been, say, For the preceding year I had worked as a manager. But then I left that job. Aug 22, 2023 at 10:13

2 Answers 2

5

These don't break any fundamental grammar rules, but are oddly phrased and not very natural.

"Last year" in many contexts refers to calendar years, (so last year was 2022) You could say, "Last year I was working as a manager", which means "in 2022".

Or you can use "for the last year" meaning "until now", but then you'd use the present perfect: "For the last year I've been working... "

Your sentences don't work since they mix a past tense sentence with a present perfect time phrase.

4

You are still employed as a manager:

For the past year, I have been working as a manager.

You are no longer employed as a manager:

Until recently, I was working as a manager.

(Up) until two months ago, I had been working as a manager.

The word ago establishes a time in the past, and actions taking place before that time can be expressed with the past perfect continuous.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .