1

Does 'The reason I did it was so (that) I could avoid being caught' sound natural?

I think it is grammatically correct, at least. i just felt more or less confused, shouldn't i state my reason when i say it, something like 'The reason I did it was that i wanted to avoid being caught.'

The original sentence sounds to me like instead of stating 'the reason', it is stating a fact that 'i could avoid getting caught after i did it'.

Could anyone lend me a hand here, much appreciated!

6
  • 1
    IMO more natural would be "The reason I did it was to avoid being caught." Aug 22, 2023 at 21:15
  • @WeatherVane thank u for ur comment. could u help me a bit more to confirm whether the sentence with 'so that' is understandable and used by anyone on some occasions?
    – Date1
    Aug 22, 2023 at 21:26
  • Both versions of your sentence are understandable. People do say it like that, but it's a bit of a mouthful. Aug 22, 2023 at 21:29
  • 1
    @WeatherVane got it, thanks a bunch
    – Date1
    Aug 22, 2023 at 21:38
  • 1
    In spoken English, I'd probably say "I didn't want to get caught" or "so I didn't get caught". The "the reason I did it..." is likely implicit in a conversation: "Why did you smash the security camera?" "I didn't want to get caught". Agreed though, "so that" is totally understandable and natural.
    – Kaia
    Aug 23, 2023 at 0:51

2 Answers 2

1

It is grammatically fine.

It feels unnecessary to say "The reason...was".

I did it so I could avoid being caught.

would sound more idiomatic.

Or, better:

I did it to avoid being caught.

0

You can say :

I did it so (that) I could avoid being caught.

The reason I did it was to avoid being caught.

I did it to avoid being caught.

I did it so (that) I didn't get caught.

I did it in order to avoid being caught.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .