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Example:

  • Why don't airlines like when one intentionally misses a flight to save money?
  • Why don't airlines like it when one intentionally misses a flight to save money?

Are they both grammatically correct, and if so, are they synonymous?

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    As a British English speaker I don't find the first one idiomatic. Commented Aug 23, 2023 at 14:58
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    People increasingly discard the pronoun it in such contexts, but that's still a "minority usage". Mainstream grammar would still say the pronoun should be present. I makes no real difference to the meaning, though. Commented Aug 23, 2023 at 15:43
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    In AmE, the pronoun is even more often discarded, and both would be colloquialy acceptable. See books.google.com/ngrams/…,: "like when" far exceeds "like it when". Commented Aug 23, 2023 at 16:09
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    @DrMoishePippik I suspect that your ngrams include various unrelated usages. (For example, "That's what it will look like when it's done.") Commented Aug 24, 2023 at 3:35
  • As an American English speaker, one is not idiomatic and this AmE/BrE thing is not relevant. People forget that for BrE there are millions of fewer speakers than for AmE but that does not make supposed AmE different from BrE in many cases. This is one of them. Looking on the Internet brings up a lot of crummy speech.
    – Lambie
    Commented Oct 25, 2023 at 14:08

2 Answers 2

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Why don't airlines like when one intentionally misses a flight to save money?

The verb like is generally transitive in standard English. It requires an object. To make it grammatical, it needs it.

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As a native British English speaker, the second option reads naturally, but the first sounds incorrect. I'd be left thinking 'why don't airlines like what, when one intentionally misses...'

When using the first person, both options would probably be heard in everyday speech, but it would still be more natural to say 'I like it when'.

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