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THis is a part of the script in the social network film

Erica Albright : Well, why don't you just concentrate on being the best you you can be.

Mark Zuckerberg : Did you really just say that?

Erica Albright : I was kidding. Although just because something's trite doesn't make it any less true.

They say "the best you", so I reckon we can have some adjectives before objective personal pronouns.

Can we have adjectives before objective personal pronouns, for example, "I have some photos of baby him"?

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    In my photo album are pictures of: baby him, two-year-old me, elderly Dad. Lucky me! Commented Aug 25, 2023 at 13:55

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Well, why don't you just concentrate on being [the best you (that) you can be].

"(That) you can be" is a relative clause modifying "you", where "that" is optional.

Thus, "the best you (that) you can be" is a noun phrase in which "you" is modified by the relative clause "(that) you can be".

In your other example "I have some photos of baby him", "baby him" is a noun phrase in which the objective pronoun "him" is modified by the nominal "baby".

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    No, @BillJ, the quote in the OP is “the best you you can be,” which means, essentially, “the best version of yourself.” It has something of the flavor of “You 2.0.” Commented Aug 25, 2023 at 14:33
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    @PaulTanenbaum Yes, of course. I hastily misread the two you's as being a typo. I have corrected my answer. Interestingly, the first "you" is head of the whole NP, while the second is complement of "be" in the relative clause.
    – BillJ
    Commented Aug 25, 2023 at 15:25
  • @BillJ I agree about the relative clause, but OP's question is still valid since in the phrase "the best you ([that] you can be)," "best" is an adjective modifying the pronoun "you." It's not an objective personal pronoun though, since "to be" is followed by a predicate, not an object. Commented Aug 26, 2023 at 1:51
  • It goes without saying that "best" modifies"you". Unlike most of the other personal pronouns, there is no case distinction with "you". We generally refer to it as 'plain' case.
    – BillJ
    Commented Aug 26, 2023 at 6:47

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