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Nylenna's study showed that errors in scientific manuscripts submitted for publication often escape reviewer's notice, results that were not _______: when Godlee conducted a study of the same phenomenon, her findings were similar.

A. credible B. unwelcome C. anomalous D. quantifiable E. consequential

The answer is indeed C. My question is: What's the usage of "results"? Is "results" a subject? But the sentence "Nylenna's study... notice" is already complete. Alternatively, is "results" an appositive? If so, which subject is it identifying?

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Yes, "results" is an appositive. It is in apposition to the nominal clause "that errors in scientific manuscripts submitted for publication often escape reviewer's notice". (I would have used the singular phrase "a result", but the author apparently chose to use the plural form instead.)

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  • I think the singular is much better. The plural makes me think that the results are from the manuscripts (suggesting A as the answer), not from the singular study. And should reviewer be singular?
    – tgdavies
    Aug 26, 2023 at 1:10
  • @tgdavies Yes, the writer seems to be using reviewer as a kind of generic term, which seems unusual to me, too—especially since manuscripts is plural. I'd write reviwers' instead. Aug 26, 2023 at 16:58
  • I wonder whether the question is deliberately oddly written to make it more difficult.
    – tgdavies
    Aug 26, 2023 at 21:47
  • "escape the reviewer's notice" is definitely better. I also agree that this has been deliberately constructed clumsily to make the question trickier. Sep 25, 2023 at 11:16
  • It is an appositive but the word results is a noun.
    – Lambie
    Jan 23 at 16:00

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