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When I'm, say, describing a cooking adventure, which of these would be correct? Or if both are correct, which one sounds more usual?

  1. "I weighed 10g salt and added it to the pot."

  2. "I weighed 10g of salt and added it to the pot."

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    “10 g of salt” Aug 27, 2023 at 11:31
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    And the same holds true for almost anything that can be quantified with some unit of measure. Three days of snow. Two weeks of fun in the sun. Three drops of dragon blood. The pattern is so ubiquitous, you can create your own unit of measure: Two tsks of shaming. Aug 28, 2023 at 0:37
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    Note that in scientific/technical writing this might be omitted. "100 mL 1M HCl was added to the solution". I'd prefer 10g of salt in your case, especially for cooking. But you might hear it said the other way in specific cases.
    – Kaia
    Aug 28, 2023 at 18:51

1 Answer 1

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It's "10g of salt". "of" is a preposition so it is used here before a noun to show the relationship between the salt and the "10g".

From @KateBunting's comment:

The list of ingredients will say 10g salt, but in speech or a written narrative we would include the of.

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    The list of ingredients will say 10g salt, but in speech or a written narrative we would include the of. Aug 27, 2023 at 13:04
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    To be very clear, recipes and directions (e.g. on packets) are usually provided in abbreviated form, and such things as prepositions are omitted and measurements given in abbreviated forms (for example 'g' instead of 'grammes', 'tbsp' instead of 'teaspoons full', 'deg C' instead of 'degrees Celsius'). In narrative writing or in speech you don't do that. Aug 27, 2023 at 19:26
  • In fact, 'tbsp' in UK recipes means 'tablespoon(s)'. A 'tsp' is a teaspoon full. Aug 30, 2023 at 15:07

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