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I have the original sentences:

We climbed to the top of the tower. We had a beautiful view from there.

We have been instructed to rewrite the above sentences using relative pronoun/relative adverb. And the answers are:

(1) We climbed to the top tower which we had a beautiful view from.

(2) We climbed to the top tower from which we had a beautiful view.

I wonder if I could use relative adverb “where” to rewrite the sentence like this:

We climbed to the top of tower where we had a beautiful view.

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    Hi. Which one do you think is the correct answer?
    – Billy Kerr
    Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 13:05
  • As @Billy Kerr asks, what choices do you think are valid? And why? Also (here’s a hint for another approach): Don’t feel straitjacketed by the original passage’s order. How might you come up with a valid answer in which “We had a wonderful view” is the main clause? Commented Aug 28, 2023 at 13:42
  • No: You need We climbed to the top tower from where we had a beautiful view.
    – BillJ
    Commented Aug 29, 2023 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

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I assume the words "of the" were accidentally left out.

We climbed to the top of the tower, which we had a beautiful view from.

I think this is acceptable, but is rather awkward because of the long gap between "which" and "from". Some people (incorrectly, see e.g. Fowler) believe that it is wrong to end a sentence with a proposition. Probably that is the "mistake" this exercise is supposed to "correct".

We climbed to the top of the tower, from which we had a beautiful view.

I think this is better style, as it is easier for the reader to understand. You can immediately see what the "from" applies to.

We climbed to the top of tower, where we had a beautiful view.

This is also fine.

Note that, in all three cases, a comma should be used, since what comes after it is a non-defining relative clause. See this explanation.

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