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I saw the first time 'worth' acting as a predicate adjective here:

I do it because it makes me happy. And I now know that I deserve happiness. I deserve love, rest and time for myself. Because I am worth.

I must have repeated “I am worth” a million times.

And this comment:

So you told people you needed to take care of yourself and you repeatedly told yourself, "I am worth"? It seems so simple. Do you feel like the problem is entirely gone?

I know what it means, but thought the use is kind of aberrant.

Is 'I am worth' or 'you are worth' idiomatic? Is 'you are worth what you have' equivalent to 'you are worth'? Do the two worth's behave the same grammatically?

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    "Because I am worth" makes no sense, since the adjective "worth" requires a noun complement, e.g. "I am worth a fortune".
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 15:36

2 Answers 2

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But I was wrong because the truth is that we are worth personified. Worth isn’t the result of our actions, accomplishments, and possessions; it isn’t increased by self-sacrifice. It is the essence of our being, the foundation of our existence.

Judging from the above paragraph I think the author intends to use worth as a noun - conveying not that they're worth something, but that they are the concept of worth, personified.

It's definitely an off-beat usage and seems at a first glance as a misspelling of "I am worth it", but it makes a bit more sense in context.

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    @LernerZhang the obsolete, except in Scots annotation seems to indicate so. For what it's worth (heh), I have not encountered this usage in modern English. Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 9:45
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    The possibility of a typing error should be considered. 'Because I'm worth it' is a widely used cliché. Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 9:51
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    @MichaelHarvey it's repeated at least thrice, so it seems either intentional or a pretty large gap in the author's knowledge of English. I'm willing to give the author the benefit of the doubt and say she's playing with that cliché intentionally. Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 10:08
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    @MaciejStachowski - that goes with the 'self-help woo' nature of the blog. Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 13:09
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    In "I am worth __", "worth" is an adjective, not a noun.
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 19, 2023 at 15:39
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worth is a noun but you need an adjective:

... because I am ________.

You are looking for the word worthy or as the comments suggest, worth it.

You could also change the verb to "have" and use the noun worth:

... because I have worth.

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