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I'm watching an old TV show on youtube: COMBAT! s.2 ep.3: "Masquerade" (1963)

I wonder what they are exactly and literally saying from 0:26 to 0:48. All I can hear and comprehend is that:

0:26 How is it, Kirby?

0:48 OK, OK, that's a deal.

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Okay, the closest I can come to is the following. I have tried to not go into too much detail. In Kirby's second line, especially, I have tried to be as faithful to his manner of speech as possible. I have separated Kirby's lines into units, for clarity:

How is it, Kirby?

Ah, it's stopped bleeding already.

Hey, so whadja hafta knock me outta-da way for?

Another lousy three inches I'd've been sent to Battalion Aid. Be good for a coupla days. (softly: Heh.) Hey, ya never know, I go back there {and} maybe an infection'd set in, I can get sent all the way back to Paris.

Ah, okay, Kirby, next time a Kraut grenade drops by, you're on your own, buddy.

Okay, okay, that's a deal.

NOTE:

  1. Besides whadja (what did you), the other informal and/or rapid speech forms include hafta (have to), outta-da (out of the), coupla (couple of), I'd've (I would have). I'd've can be further reduced to I'd-a. In addition, I'd've can also be written as I'd of when representing spoken English. And nowadays, I'd of is being used more and more instead of I'd've in written English. I do not recommend this.

  2. Battalion Aid is short for Battalion Aid Station.

  3. I am not sure if Kirby says and where I put it in {}. Pretty soon the brain begins to fill in possible gaps for the ear.

  4. Great show, by the way!

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  • 1
    Thanks for your detailed answer. According to your explanation, "Hey, so whadja hafta knock me outta-da way for?" means "Hey, so what did you have to knock me out of the way for?". However, I wonder what it means. Regards, – Makoto Kato Oct 1 '14 at 0:53
  • A German soldier threw a grenade that landed near Kirby. The American soldier named Caje knocked Kirby out of the way of the main blast force of the grenade. Therefore Kirby suffered lesser injury from the grenade explosion. Note: Caje is the one who says "Ah, okay, Kirby..." By this, he is joking that next time he won't knock Kirby out of the way of a grenade explosion. – user6951 Oct 1 '14 at 4:17
  • I think you're right about the "and." He pronounces it as "'n" and runs it into the word "maybe" without a pause. It sounds like "nmaybe." – Jason Patterson Nov 8 '14 at 21:31
  • Please, please NEVER write "I'd of" in place of "I'd've". – Hellion Nov 8 '14 at 21:34
  • @Hellion I guess I won't any time soon, because I am not working on a novel that requires a "colloquial" representation of I'd've. But I've seen it in John Dos Passos, and others. Not just him, but soon I stop making a list of writers who use certain "expressions." – user6951 Nov 9 '14 at 2:17
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Minus two small parts [sic].

How is it Kirby?

Ah, it's stopped bleeding already.

8 Sergeant had to knock me [sic] Another [sic] 3 inches and I'd've been sent to Batallion E... Be good for a couple of days. Hey! You never know, I go back there, maybe an infection could set in... I could get sent all the way back to Paris.

Ah ok, Kirby. Next time a Kraut grenade drops by, you're on your own buddy!

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  • To fill in those [sic] parts, I think they said, "Ah, it's stopped bleeding already. Hey, so what you had to knock me outta way for? Only allow these three inches and I'd've been sent to Battalion E." "Be good for a couple of days." "Hey, you never know! I go back there and maybe an infection would set in. I get sent all the way back to Paris!" – Damkerng T. Sep 25 '14 at 14:13
  • Props. Give the man props. I had assumed "8 Sergeant" - I now have no idea why! – JMB Sep 25 '14 at 14:16
  • Batallions not designated by letters, but by numbers. @DamkerngT. – user6951 Sep 25 '14 at 19:59

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