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Can one use

a. He talked to us who were new at the office.

b. He talked to you who were new at the office.

c. He talked to them who were new at the office.

instead of

a1. He talked to those of us who were new at the office.

b1. He talked to those of you who were new at the office.

c1. He talked to those of them who were new at the office.

I want to see if pronouns in the objective case can be postmodified with a restrictive clause.

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    No, the second set is much more idiomatic than the first set.
    – Lambie
    Oct 5, 2023 at 21:55

1 Answer 1

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From FumbleFingers's comment/answer:

Yes, you can do that. Your actual examples are all slightly "unusual", but that's probably because (with or without those of) the construction is relatively complex for the likely context.

Normally, it would be contextually obvious and/or irrelevant whether the specified "new" people were also us, you, them, so we wouldn't try to shoehorn that superfluous information into the utterance. We'd just say He talked to those who were new at the office.

But "The vicar spoke to those of the congregation who stayed behind after the service" (same syntax) is a perfectly normal utterance.

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