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As we know Present Continuous is used with always / constantly to express some emotional nuance (often negative). e.g. My sister is always borrowing my clothes without asking! Can we similarly use never e.g. He is never telling the truth.

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    Idiomatically speaking, you definitely can't combine never with the continuous participle the same as always. If there's a reason for this (as opposed to just established idiomatic usage), maybe it's to do with the fact that continuous actions require time during which to happen, which never explicitly denies exists for the cited action. Commented Oct 7, 2023 at 10:15
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    But we can use never with states that are continuing - "He's never at home when I call" - "You're never in a good mood early in the morning." Commented Oct 7, 2023 at 11:29

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No, the usage of [ "always" + continuous ] to express annoyance about a regularly occurring event is a fixed structure, and doesn't allow any other adverbs of frequency to be used in the place of "always" and keep that function.

The sentence "He's never telling the truth" is good grammar, but is just a neutral statement with no nuance of negativity. It could mean many things in the right context -- including expressing a regularly occurring event -- but none of them add the nuance of annoyance:

He files a complaint every week or so, but he's never telling the truth.

In this case, "he's never telling the truth" roughly means in each case, it turns out that he's not telling the truth. While that situation may or not be annoying, the grammar doesn't imply it the same way "always" would, like in this example:

He files a complaint every week or so, but he's always lying.

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While it is true that the present continuous tense does not always mean something is 'ongoing', if something never happens then it is neither present, nor continuous.

So, you would not say "my sister is never borrowing my clothes". You could say:

My sister never borrows my clothes.

There are some occasions when it is idiomatic to use 'be' with certain verbs in the present-continuous tense and negate the statement - for example, instead of saying "don't worry about me", you could tell someone "don't be worrying about me". Note that, unlike your example, this is not a statement of what doesn't happen but rather what you are asking not to happen.

Further, I wouldn't agree that 'always' and 'continuously' are "often negative" - That would depend entirely on the context. For example, you could say "my sister is always helping me", and that would be quite nice, wouldn't it?

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    -1 The fact that continuous is used has nothing to do with whether the event itself is continuous. Future plans aren't continuous, and neither is my sister borrowing my clothes. To indicate that something happens on a regular basis without any other nuance, we use present simple: My sister borrows my clothes." To indicate a such a regular event (not a constant one) with the nuance of annoyance, we use "always" + present continuous. It's also possible to use "never" with continuous forms.
    – gotube
    Commented Oct 7, 2023 at 19:56
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    @gotube that wasn't the point at all. I didn't say that we can't use the continuous tense if something isn't continuing... just that, in this case, it never happens. I was appealing to the OP to use logic and see why the present continuous tense could not be used.
    – Astralbee
    Commented Oct 8, 2023 at 16:23
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    Your logic still doesn't flow. If something that never happens isn't present, then why does the correct sentence with "never" have the present simple tense? I'm sure you're familiar with the function of [ "always" + present continuous ] to express annoyance at something that happens regularly. This question is only about whether [ "never" + present continuous ] has that same function. It does not.
    – gotube
    Commented Oct 9, 2023 at 8:29
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    @gotube The 'present simple' is also the present indefinite. It isn't just about events, but conditions that exist. When you negate it, the condition doesn't exist. It's that simple. We don't use present continuous for these kinds of statements, but I think you know that and are just doubling down on this minutiae detail to avoid admitting that, ultimately, the answer is correct.
    – Astralbee
    Commented Oct 9, 2023 at 11:47

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