0

Can this statement be rephrased without using the word "because" or sounding elegant

The fee is discounted substantially because organizations are expected to have a long term contract, a minimum of a year.

  • 3
    I find as as the best replacement for because in most of the cases! :) – Maulik V Sep 26 '14 at 7:25
  • I find " for" to be a possibility as well – Scarl Sep 26 '14 at 8:57
1

The fee is discounted substantially because organizations are expected to have a long term contract, a minimum of a year.

You could use since:

The fee is discounted substantially since organizations are expected to have a long term contract, with the (a? its?) term lasting a year or more.

| improve this answer | |
0

The fee is discounted substantially when there is a long term contract of at least one year.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That rephrasing implies that there are short term contracts, which the original doesn't. Granted with more context, that sentence might fit what the poster is trying to communicate. The single sentence alone reads more like a justification of why the fee is discounted than a statement that the fee is discounted. – ColleenV Sep 26 '14 at 16:31
  • "expected" does not imply only long term. It would need to say "must have" – talves Sep 27 '14 at 17:48
-1

Yes, it can be written without the coordinating conjunction "because":

The fee is discounted substantially due to the fact that organizations will have a long term contract, a minimum of a year.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    "due to the fact that" is just a longer way of saying "because", it is not an improvement and isn't more elegant. – laugh salutes Monica C Jan 1 '18 at 22:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.