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Are both of those sentences grammatically correct?

I am going to probably leave my children with a babysitter until I get employment.

Or

I am probably going to leave my children with a babysitter until I get employment.

I know the second is correct, but is the first also correct?

I have come across a sentence which is very similar to this sentence in structure:

Some experts think unemployment is to likey go on rising this year.

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    The first is not idiomatic, although you might split an infinitive with an adverb like 'kindly'. Anyway, where will you leave the children after you get employment? Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 21:30
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    "to likely go".... "to boldly go"... Some experts think unemployment is likely to go on rising this year. Commented Oct 20, 2023 at 21:32
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    Whether or not it's strictly permitted by the rules of grammar, the first sentence with that usage of "probably" sounds clumsy and not-quite-right, as if they were a foreign speaker, or perhaps choosing to saying it in a funny way.
    – Sam
    Commented Oct 21, 2023 at 18:12

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Yes, they are both technically acceptable, but the second is best. The first creates a split infinitive---it breaks up "to leave." You can, on occasion, get away with doing that when a phrase has become so widely accepted in the culture as to stand on its own, but as a rule, you should avoid doing so. Purely grammatically, it isn't correct in the strictest sense---though everyone would understand what you meant either way.

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