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I found in eslbase the following 1

Wish and hope

To express that you want something to happen in the future (not wanting a situation to be different, and not implying impatience or annoyance) "hope" is used instead of "wish".

  • I hope it’s sunny tomorrow.
    “I wish it was sunny tomorrow” is not correct.

  • I hope she passes her exam next week.
    “I wish she were passing her exam next week” is not correct.

  • I hope the plane doesn’t crash tomorrow.
    “I wish the plane wouldn’t crash tomorrow” is not correct.

I found in BritishCouncil the following 2:

We use past tense modals would and could to talk about wishes for the future:

Examples:

  • I don't like my work. I wish I could get a better job.

  • That's a dreadful noise. I wish it would stop.

I found in Grammar In Review by Marcelle Gant the following sentences:

  • She wishes he would join them (She's sorry he isn't joining them).

  • I wish I could go with you tomorrow.

wish

I also heard the following sentence from a native speaker of English language:

I wish you would grow up.

Are the sentences "She wishes he would join them","I wish I could go with you tomorrow" and "I wish you would grow up" grammatically correct? I believe that all of them are wrong because we don't use those sentences to express that we want a situation to be different. We use those sentences to express that we want something to happen in the future. So we have to express those sentences with the word "hope".

  • She hopes he joins them.

  • I hope I can go with you tomorrow.

  • I hope you grow up.

I believe that all the above sentences are correct. Could you please tell me your opinion?

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  • All the ones in your last paragraph are, in fact, grammatically correct.
    – Lambie
    Oct 25, 2023 at 14:15

1 Answer 1

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But those sentences do express that we want the situation to be different! The first one explicitly says so.

She wishes he would join them (She's sorry he isn't joining them).

I wish I could go with you tomorrow (implies that I can't).

I wish you would grow up (said to a person behaving in an immature way).

The first two would only use I hope if the speaker didn't know whether the hoped-for thing was possible or not. No-one would say "I hope you grow up". Every child will grow up unless something dreadful happens to them, and we wouldn't make a comment like that about the possibility of someone not living to grow up.

All versions are grammatically correct (well, She hopes he will join them would be better), but the first two mean different things with different verbs and I hope you grow up is not idiomatic.

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  • So yes, all three of these sentences are grammatically (and stylistically) correct. They are entirely idiomatic. Oct 25, 2023 at 12:21
  • I hope you grow up. is okay grammar-wise.
    – Lambie
    Oct 25, 2023 at 14:16
  • @Kate Bunting Hi! Thank you very much for your answer! I upvoted and I accepted it! Oct 26, 2023 at 4:30

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