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I won't give one just yet, but I will in a minute.

I don't have the table finished just yet.

With not just yet, why are there times when verbs are in the present forms and times when verbs are in the future forms?

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2 Answers 2

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I won't give you candy just yet because dinner will be ready soon. I will give you candy after dinner.

We have a clear present/future scenario in the little domestic scene above. The sentence with I won't means "no candy for you now". I have no intention whatsoever of giving you candy now. The sentence with "I will" means "you can expect to have some candy after dinner". My intention is to give you candy after dinner.

But will isn't a future form strictly speaking. It can be used in combination with another verb to create a future or near-future meaning. Intention is always future-looking, even when the intention involves the immediate present, "just yet".

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I won't give one just yet, but I will in a minute.

'Will' here is used in the second part of the sentence which is talking about the future (after a minute from the present).

Negative~ just yet is used to express an action that has not happened yet but probably will soon.

Example: She won't leave just yet. Generally implying that something else needs to happen before she leaves. ie you need to serve her some tea.

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