2

Which one is more correct:

"The brand new album of one of the most favorite groups of mine."

"A brand new album of one of the most favorite groups of mine."

To me, the first one sounds more correct.

1

As Jim mentioned in his answer, there is not enough context to determine a "correct" answer to your question, because either one could be correct, depending on what you are saying, and what message you are trying to convey.

Consider:

I was trudging through the snow, wishing I was someplace warm, when I passed the music store. That's when I saw it in the shop window: a brand-new album from one of my favorite groups!

That's perfectly grammatical, and there's nothing wrong with that statement. Yet I could also say:

I was trudging through the snow, wishing I was someplace warm, when I passed the music store. That's when I saw it in the shop window: the brand-new album from one of my favorite groups!

That's also grammatical and correct, and I would argue that any shift in the sentence's meaning is relatively insignificant.

In the first sentence, the indefinite article a can be used, because we might be talking about a particular copy of the new album – the one I am looking at. That may make it sound like I should use the, but look at it this way: There have been over 100,000 copies of the CD minted, and one of those happens to be in the window of my local record store. It's not any different from the copies I might find in Chicago, or Los Angeles, or Nashville, or Liverpool, or Jammu – or even from the other copies I may find on the shelf inside the store – it's just a copy of the CD, so a works in that sentence.

Yet the can also work, because we are not talking about just any album by my favorite group, we are talking about their latest album. This isn't One Hot Minute, By the Way, or Stadium Arcadium, this is I'm with You. Every group has only one latest album, and we can always call that the latest (or, at least for the first few weeks after release, the “brand-new”) album by that group, so the also works in that sentence.


As a footnote, there's still room for a little bit of ambiguity here. Suppose “one of my favorite groups” referred to the Beatles, and the album I saw was Abbey Road. The album was made of black vinyl, in its original cover, still shrink wrapped:

I was trudging through the snow, wishing I was someplace warm, when I passed the music store. That's when I saw it in the shop window: a brand-new album from one of my favorite groups!

In this case, the phrase brand-new album doesn't refer to a new release, but to a never-opened copy. But even in this case, either article could be used:

I was trudging through the snow, wishing I was someplace warm, when I passed the music store. That's when I saw it in the shop window: the brand-new album from one of my favorite groups!

In the second sentence, I'm not just talking about any of the 17 known unopened Abbey Road albums in existence, but the particular copy that happens to be in my record store window.

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5

It really depends on what you are trying to say. First, though, it sounds more natural to say:

... of one of my [most] favorite groups.

Then, if you a referring to a specific album you use the. For example:

The brand new album of one of my favorite groups costs $25.00; I haven't decided whether I'm going to buy it or not.

But if you are referring to just brand new albums in general then use a:

A brand new album from one of my favorite groups is always a big temptation to stray from my strict budget.

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  • @EugeneAximenko- You are welcome. If you like the answer you can upvote it (click on the up arrow above the number at the left of the answer) and if you you feel it answers your question the best of all the answers provided, then you can "accept" it by clicking the check mark there on the left as well. – Jim Mar 4 '13 at 8:15

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