0

Lots of sources often say adverbial clauses modify the main verb.

I wonder if adverbial clauses can modify more than two verbs, like in the examples below

Example 1

He "wears pink in the winter but does not wear pink in the summer" because for him, pink clothing is winter fashion.

Example 2

He "eats vegetables but do not eat meat" because he knows what is healthy and his body doesn't digest meat well.

Does the adverbial clause in bold modify the whole thing instead of just the main verb?

3
  • 3
    does not eat meat Nov 29, 2023 at 5:02
  • Is this really an English question? Wouldn't the logic be the same in any language? Nov 29, 2023 at 8:48
  • He brushes his teeth after every meal, obeys the speed limit, and pays his taxes on time because he wants to be a model citizen. I would say that the clause headed by because applies (semantically) to the combined assertions in the main clause, not to each verb phrase individually.
    – TimR
    Nov 29, 2023 at 10:20

1 Answer 1

1

He "wears pink in the winter but does not wear pink in the summer," because for him, pink clothing is winter fashion.

He "eats vegetables but [does] not eat meat", because he knows what is healthy and his body doesn't digest meat well.

Both wears and wear in #1 are main verbs, and are modified by their adverbial clause.

#2 is similar; both eats and eat are main verbs, and are modified by their adverbial clause.

To see clearer that eat is also a main verb, you can say

He eats vegetables, but he does not eat meat, because he knows what is healthy and his body doesn't digest meat well.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .