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On google, I found sentences using the preposition "into" like this:

  1. He was halfway into a bottle of wine.

Could sentence 1 be a slangy version of this:

  1. He was halfway through a bottle of wine.

which replaces "into" with "through"?

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    They’re about the same, yes. Sep 29, 2014 at 20:08
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    I don't really think "slangy" is an appropriate word here. It's just that for this exact context, we're more likely to use through. Conversely, "We were halfway into the film when the projector broke down" may actually be more likely than through. Certainly if we replace halfway with half an hour, the into version becomes far more likely to me. But it's all just idiomatic preference - "slanginess" (and indeed semantics) aren't really relevant. Sep 29, 2014 at 22:03
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    I don't know if this is a common thing, but the use of into implies to me that the person set out with the goal of finishing the bottle in order to become drunk (along the lines of "he crawled into a bottle" -> he purposely drank to excess in order to forget his troubles); while the use of through would have no such implication, more likely meaning that he didn't realize how much or how quickly he'd been drinking, or that he'd been drinking (at a normal rate) for a long time.
    – Hellion
    Sep 29, 2014 at 22:08
  • @Hellion: You're quite right, which arguably implies I was wrong to say there are no semantic implications. But I think they only arise because we know that through would be more likely in OP's context, so we creatively look for any credible alternative meaning that might have caused the writer to use a different word. So at least part of the justification for your nuanced distinction doesn't so much lie in the specific word into - it's just the fact that the more "normal" preposition wasn't used. Sep 29, 2014 at 23:06

1 Answer 1

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Yes, you can replace "into" with "through" to get the same meaning. It also sounds slightly less casual.

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