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What does '' who '' refer to ? Is this sentence grammatically correct ?

There was a friend of this woman, who loves me.

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  • Hi. Where did you find this sentence? What is the context?
    – Billy Kerr
    Dec 9, 2023 at 18:23
  • Your example sentence is ambiguous and poorly punctuated. Where did you encounter it? Dec 9, 2023 at 18:24
  • I wanted to say that the one who loves me is this woman's friend. Did I write it wrong?
    – emilywenly
    Dec 9, 2023 at 18:31
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    “This woman has a friend who loves me”? But if that’s what you mean, then why the past tense there was? Dec 9, 2023 at 20:14
  • Or “One of this woman’s friends loves me”? Dec 9, 2023 at 20:14

1 Answer 1

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This is a poorly constructed sentence. You could probably create a context in which it would be valid, but it would be unusual.

I think your question is about the "who" part. So if you change the tense to agree, it helps:

(1) There is a friend of this woman who loves me.

(2) There is a friend of this woman, who loves me.

I believe that:

In (1), who refers to the woman.

In (2), who refers to the friend.

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