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Do we need the conjunction 'and' along with comma, or we can leave it just with comma in below sentence?

With the help of these properties, a human being is able to behave as if the external or internal situation were different from that which reasonable experience (observation) says (the boundary is not always clear), and were more – or less – in line with one’s wants and needs.

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    That sentence needs to be reworked, extensively. It has several issues (e.g., word choice: says??), but most obviously, it goes on and on between the two weres. The second were really isn't enough to smoothly pick up where the first were left off…so long ago.
    – HippoSawrUs
    Dec 11, 2023 at 16:42
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    I'm not impressed with the text either, but don't think the (optional) comma is relevant. The word and can't possibly be discarded, but I see no problem in throwing out the second instance of 'subjunctive' were. Personally, I think it's actually easier to parse without the second were, because I can almost persuade myself there's a deleted are rather than were (the sooner I can forget that subjunctive, the better! :) Dec 11, 2023 at 18:42

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The "and" is required as it joins co-ordinate clauses. The comma is a matter of opinion/style/choice.

With the help of these properties, a human being is able to behave

{(i) as if the external or internal situation were different from that which reasonable experience says[,]

and

(ii) [as if the external or internal situation] were more – or less – in line with one’s wants and needs.}

The comma is used between the first two items of a list of three or more items and implies the conjunction in the context.

"The balls come in three colours: red, blue[,] and green." -> the comma after "red" is understood as "and". The comma after "blue" is considered a pause comma, not a conjunctive comma.

"You can choose one colour: red, blue[,] or green." -> the comma after "red" is understood as "or". The comma after "blue" is considered a pause comma, not a conjunctive comma.

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