1

I would like to know first if both expressions are commonly used by English people. If yes, what is the best to use in which circumstances, if they are different.

For example, what would be the correct version (if any)?

I just would like that the items are indented in relation to the section Greetings.

or

I just would like that the items are indented respect to the section Greetings.

May related to also suit for this situation?

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  • You may want to revise the construction of "want somebody to do something". – JMB Sep 30 '14 at 14:06
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    in relation to is pretty much the same as with respect to. Note the with. – user6951 Sep 30 '14 at 20:50
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Both are understandable, but both sound unnatural.

Correct, natural sentences:

  1. I would simply like the items indented in relation to the Greetings section.
  2. I would simply like the items indented with regards to the Greetings section.

Sentence 1 here is most natural.

My substitution of "I would simply" for your "I just would" is as close as I could get to something natural sounding to what I think you mean by your phrasing.

"I would simply" sounds like it is an attempt to stress how simple/easy the request is.

More plainly would be the request: "Please indent the items in relation to the Greetings section."

I hope that helps clear things up.


John

North East of the USA.

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