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Please, help me understand how these verbs work in English. Should I use the simple or the perfect aspect to talk about the final moment of the actions (when the intended effect comes in power)?

marinate

  • I put the turkey into marinade two hours ago and it will marinate in ten hours (the whole process takes 12 hours), then you can cook it.
  • I put the turkey into marinade two hours ago and it will have marinated in ten hours (the whole process takes 12 hours), then you can cook it.

steep/brew

  • I put a teabag in the mug and poured in boiling water a minute ago. The tea will steep/brew in two minutes (the whole process takes 3 minutes), then you can drink it.
  • I put a teabag in the mug and poured in boiling water a minute ago. The tea will have steeped/brewed in two minutes (the whole process takes 3 minutes), then you can drink it.

deliver

  • The courier started delivering the order an hour ago (He's still delivering it). He'll deliver it in two hours.
  • The courier started delivering the order an hour ago (He's still delivering it). He'll have delivered it in two hours.

I've asked about this one already

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  • It will marinade is wrong. The verb is: to marinate. We marinate X for [number of hours].
    – Lambie
    Commented Dec 16, 2023 at 16:04
  • The future perfect is used to suggest an action will be finished/completed before a specific time in the future while the simple future does not. It only refers to a future time when an action/event will happen.
    – Billy Kerr
    Commented Dec 16, 2023 at 16:27
  • @Lambie I've fixed it now, but that's not the point of my question. Commented Dec 16, 2023 at 16:30
  • @BillyKerr I understand that, but the point is that English speaking people's understanding of "It will happen" can be very different from my understanding. I would treat each of these actions in the simple aspect as finished, but I'm not sure about that now after receiving some replies (from the link I've provided at the bottom) about the verbs "deliver" and "marinate". Commented Dec 16, 2023 at 16:34
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    @IlyaTretyakov -Yes we will still understand these from context, because you have already included a time in the sentence with the simple future. However, the first one about marinating is a little odd, because marinating is a process that takes time. IMHO it would be better to say "will marinate for ten hours", also similar for brewing: "will brew for 3 minutes.". This isn't a major mistake however. Deliver is a little different - When we "deliver" something, it's generally understood as a one-time/single event. It's absolutely fine to say "He will deliver it in two hours".
    – Billy Kerr
    Commented Dec 16, 2023 at 16:46

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