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Snow covered the hills. (source)

Question: Is "covered" a dynamic verb or a stative verb?

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  • Does it matter? The "static" or "dynamic" nature of a verb is part of its meaning, not its grammar. If you understand the meaning, then you don't need the analysis.
    – James K
    Dec 17, 2023 at 23:37
  • @JamesK I don't know whether the sentence states the state or the action.
    – Kaguyahime
    Dec 18, 2023 at 0:13
  • How would these be different? In Japanese, for example, is there a difference.
    – James K
    Dec 18, 2023 at 0:30
  • In Japanese, there is a difference. "雪が丘を覆った" expresses the action. "雪が丘を覆っていた" expresses the state.
    – Kaguyahime
    Dec 18, 2023 at 0:38
  • Thank you, but that is the address of this thread.
    – Kaguyahime
    Dec 21, 2023 at 4:00

1 Answer 1

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From my understanding, it could be both dynamic and stative depending on what idea you're trying to express. If you're trying to express the idea that it snowed, and snow built up on the field, then it's dynamic since that refers to the action of snow having covered the hills. If you're trying to express the idea that there was simply a lot of snow on the hills, then it's stative.

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  • @Thank you, Kyle Colbourne. I don't know whether the sentence states the state or the action. Isn't the sentence ambiguous to the listener/reader?
    – Kaguyahime
    Dec 18, 2023 at 0:18
  • If it's a sentence like this on its own, it can be ambiguous. However, as is the case with ambiguity, it can be discerned through context. Dec 20, 2023 at 9:49

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