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(1) The new signs will be very confusing for tourists.

(2) All this information can be confusing to the user.

(source)

Question: Could you please explain to me why (1) uses for while (2) uses to?

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    The two prepositions could be swapped there with little practical change of meaning. I would say that the sentence with for refers to how the signs present information, and the sentence with to refers to the limitations of users. The complement of for can be the intended audience, and the complement of to can be those affected by something. "Some plants are poisonous to cats". "Some herbal supplements are beneficial for people with arthritis."
    – TimR
    Commented Dec 23, 2023 at 14:58
  • (1) A confusing situation for tourists to cope with. (2) A source of confusion to the user. As Tim says, very little actual difference in meaning. Commented Dec 23, 2023 at 15:03
  • There's not much difference in meaning, but "to tourists" is a bit more awkward to say, which is probably why your examples use them that way. Commented Jan 13 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

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My personal preference would be to use to, but you can use either to or for. They are essentially interchangeable.

The new signs will be very confusing for tourists.

The new signs will be very confusing to tourists.

All this information can be confusing to the user.

All this information can be confusing for the user.

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In this context, the two are interchangeable. You could say, "The signs will be confusing to tourists" or "This information can be confusing for the user". "Confusing to" and "Confusing for" mean the same thing.

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