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Does "given that" mean just "assuming"?

And, I am wondering what is the difference between "given" and "given that".

Furthermore, would you please tell me what is the difference between "if" and "providing that"?

Lastly, I have found the following explanations:

"given that":

  1. although

  2. assuming that; in consideration of the fact that

"given that": taking into account that, based on that (we can say that) ...

"providing that": if something happens (we can say that)

  • Where have you found "although" as a meaning for "given that"? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 1 '14 at 14:47
  • No, "given" means that it was given to you. "Assuming" means that you weren't given it so you had to assume it. – Jim Oct 1 '14 at 14:57
  • en.wiktionary.org/wiki/given_that – nima Oct 1 '14 at 15:29
  • Could anyone possibly throw a light on these such that I could get them. I am too confused to understand. – nima Oct 1 '14 at 15:29
  • This really is too many questions in one posting. I answered to the one in the above comments. – user3169 Oct 1 '14 at 16:41
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These three prepositions, given, assuming and providing mark different sorts of certainty ascribed to their objects, the facts or circumstances on which you base a conclusion.

  • Given designates a fact known to be true: you are not permitted to draw any conclusion which contradicts what is given.

  • Assuming designates a fact which is not known to be true: the conclusion you are going to draw is true if that fact is true. But the inverse is not necessarily the case: if that fact is not true, this does not mean that your conclusion is false, for the conclusion may also be true in other circumstances. The fact is sufficient but not necessary.

  • Provided designates a fact which must be true in order for your conclusion to be true. If it is not true, your conclusion is not true.

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  • +1 Right, the confusion arises when people start thinking about things like: assuming that we are given X – Jim Oct 1 '14 at 19:17
  • Great answer. What about “if”? Where does it stand in the hierarchy of gradations, if at all there? – AimForClarity Dec 16 '19 at 1:50
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I find the definitions you found interesting. More so the second one, which states:

2.assuming that; in consideration of the fact that

I find this definition contradictory, because if you're assuming something, it's not definite fact.

"Given that" is a phrase most often used in academia, universities, schools, etc, especially mathematics and physics exercises. It denotes actual evidence or facts provided to the reader or listener.

Ex. "Given that the acceleration of gravity is equal to 9.8 meters per second squared..."

This is not an assumption. Assumptions can be based on facts (see also: inference, inferring) but, as Merriam-Webster states, to assume something is to think something is true or probably true without knowing it is true. Therefore, without knowing that it is true, it cannot be fact.

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This page - given that, provided that, on condition that? has some relevant examples:

Given that there are over 20 students in the class, and only one teacher, I think they have done a marvelous job!
Given that we had so many places to stop on the way, we made pretty good time on our trip!

which could be rewritten as:

Although there are over 20 students in the class, and only one teacher, I think they have done a marvelous job!
Although we had so many places to stop on the way, we made pretty good time on our trip!

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  • Yes, but given that often doesn't have this concessive sense: it only does because of the meanings of the particular clauses in these examples. – Colin Fine Oct 1 '14 at 17:36

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