0

I study English grammar. I use a grammar book for it. Now I'm learning modal verbs and the possibility topic is difficult and confusing for me.

Here is the screenshot from the textbook: enter image description here

I'm not asking whether it's enough to talk about possibility in English. I think no. I'm asking about the way the authors decided to organize the learning process about possibility. For me the present and past possibility sections are clear to understand but the future section is not.

I asked a more detailed question before. Here is a link: Specific and general possibility in the future There you can find the way of my understanding about this topic. But here I can just want to see whether it's good or not to follow these rules from the textbook just to start talking about possibility in English.

9
  • What the textbook says is accurate. (You haven't told us what book it is!) Commented Jan 6 at 13:20
  • @KateBunting The book is MyGrammarLab Advanced C1–C2. Commented Jan 7 at 4:49
  • 1
    Artem, I will help you fix a very common error made by learners. You are studying English and using a grammar book to do so. We would not say here: I study and I use. Before you try to master all those forms, I suggest you find and do some grammar exercises for the simple present and present progressive. Also, these pages of text are for a more advanced student. I suggest you look for something simpler and only use those pages you posted for reference, but not for learning various modal forms.
    – Lambie
    Commented Feb 7 at 15:26
  • 1
    Try this site: learningenglish.voanews.com/a/…
    – Lambie
    Commented Feb 10 at 14:51
  • 1
    Then, try one of these: cambridgebookshop.co.uk/collections/elt
    – Lambie
    Commented Feb 12 at 15:02

1 Answer 1

1

As noted in the comments by Kate Bunting: What the textbook says is accurate.

But here I…just want to see whether it's good or not to follow these rules from the textbook just to start talking about possibility in English.

Since the title of the book is: MyGrammarLab Advanced C1–C2, one can deduce that the authors are presenting their material with the assumption that students have a mastery of Beginning/Intermediate concepts. Moreover, the use of such a label as Academic English should imply that students can expect to do a certain amount of nit-picking (in both the students’ most proficient language and the examples presented in the text) to understand the material comprehensively.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .