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a. People around Boston are doing well.

b. People about Boston are doing well.

c. People living around Boston are doing well.

d. People living about Boston are doing well.

In which cases does the sentence mean that people do not live within Boston, but in its close vicinity?

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    "People living near Boston". About has various meanings, including "on every side of", "in the immediate neighborhood of", and "in different parts of".
    – Stuart F
    Commented Jan 10 at 15:17
  • What does ",,," mean to you? Commented Jan 11 at 8:30

2 Answers 2

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None of your examples definitively include only the people who do not live in the city. Instead, I would say:

The people just outside of Boston are doing well...

... but the people in the city are snowed in and can't get out.

The word just is optional, but it implies that you're talking about people not in the city but very close to it. Without just, it could refer to a much broader set of people who aren't in Boston (for example, everyone else in Massachusetts).

You could also say:

  • The people on the outskirts of Boston...

  • The people in the suburbs of Boston... (or in the Boston suburbs)

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Edit

I rephrase your question:

Which are the cases that describe the people who do not live within Boston, but in its close vicinity.

#c carries that meaning.

#a could carry that meaning. It could also refer to people just working or studying around Boston.

#b and #d are strange.

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