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"It rained so much over the time that he was away. He was just drinking off of leaves." Lost dog found (see:1:08-1:13)

I understand the dog was drinking rainwater from the leaves. So, why not simply say "...drinking from leaves." but "....drinking off of leaves..."? Why do we need "off" and "of"?

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  • We don't need 'off of', which is informal and conversational. People don't always talk in a formal way like books. Commented Jan 10 at 8:16
  • @MichaelHarvey, Thanks for the comment, I understand now it is informal, but it is still correct, isn't it? I mean we can use it, too, can't we? That is what I want to find out.
    – Yunus
    Commented Jan 10 at 8:34
  • Formal and informal usages are obviously possible. Commented Jan 10 at 8:36
  • In Britain, I associate 'off of' with the London area; from her speech, the dog owner seems to come from there. Commented Jan 10 at 9:34
  • For Australian English I would regard it as wrong. I can't speak for other regions.
    – Peter
    Commented Jan 10 at 9:49

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