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There is a phrase in F. Scott Fitzgerald's short story "The Offshore Pirate" that is quite confusing to me: the golden collar.
Is it some kind of a landform? Is it simply a way to describe an island, whose shape at first seems to be thin and collar-like? But then how would it become wider later (see quote below)? I guess it could not happen because they moved closer to it, as the yacht is not moving (it is "riding at anchor").

About half-way between the Florida shore and the golden collar a white steam-yacht, very young and graceful, was riding at anchor and under a blue-and-white awning aft a yellow-haired girl reclined in a wicker settee reading The Revolt of the Angels, by Anatole France. ... The second half-lemon was well-nigh pulpless and the golden collar had grown astonishing in width, when suddenly the drowsy silence which enveloped the yacht was broken by the sound of heavy foot steps ... Five o clock rolled down from the sun and plumped soundlessly into the sea. The golden collar widened into a glittering island; and a faint breeze that had been playing with the edges of the awning and swaying one of the dangling blue slippers became suddenly freighted with song.

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The full context is this:

The Offshore Pirate I This unlikely story begins on a sea that was a blue dream, as colorful as blue-silk stockings, and beneath a sky as blue as the irises of children's eyes. From the western half of the sky the sun was shying [throwing out] little golden disks at the sea—if you gazed intently enough you could see them [the disks] skip from wave tip to wave tip until they joined a broad collar of golden coin that was collecting [coming together] half a mile out and would eventually be a dazzling sunset. About half-way between the Florida shore and the golden collar a white steam-yacht, very young and graceful, was riding at anchor and under a blue-and-white awning aft a yellow-haired girl reclined in a wicker settee reading The Revolt of the Angels, by Anatole France.

Ok, so these disks [round reflections from the sun] looked as if they we hitting the tops of the waves. [skipping over them, moving across them]. They moved all the way to a "broad collar of golden coin": this is another sun reflection that looks like a broad collar [a collar, as found on shirts or dresses or other clothes'] made of golden coin. So this mirage collar looked like it was made of a gold coin. This mirage over the water is what would become the sunset.

The whole thing is about the mirage the narrator/viewer describes of sun hitting the water and then becoming a sunset. Before it becomes a sunset, this second reflection looks like a golden collar that is reflected back from the sea to the viewer/narrator.

The golden collar is a reflection mirage. The golden collar is made up of those disks. Like a necklace. And eventually one can see that it is, in fact, an island. The girl was on the yacht which was riding at anchor off the Florida coast and this island.

Gutenberg text of the story

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