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Say, A and B is going to have a fight. A is using his bare fists and B is using a stick.

Is it natural for A to say "I let you use the stick at an advantage" or "I accept your using the stick"?

Say, there are football team A and B. A football team has 11 players. Team A thinks it can win over team B even if it can play only with 10 players.

Is it natural for team A to say "we let you play with 1 person more than us at an advantage" or "We accept your playing with 1 person more than us"?

How to say that you agree to let someone have an advantage in everyday English?

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  • "We'll let you play with 1 person more than us" is more colloquial. If you were describing the situation to someone else you might say you were "giving them an advantage". But there's not a standard way in English to inform someone that you are giving them advantageous terms.
    – Stuart F
    Jan 31 at 16:42

2 Answers 2

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Questions:

Say, A and B is going to have a fight. A is using his bare fists and B is using a stick.

Is it natural for A to say "I let you use the stick at an advantage" or "I accept your using the stick"?

Is it natural for team A to say "we let you play with 1 person more than us at an advantage" or "We accept your playing with 1 person more than us"?

Answers:
Idiom: to give someone the/an advantage

THUS:

  • I'll give you the advantage by letting you use the stick.
  • We'll give you the advantage by letting you play with one extra player.

[Please bear in mind: When offering something to someone or offering to do something for them, we use: will + the main verb and not the present simple. For example: Sure, I'll buy you a cup of coffee. Or" I'll open the window for you.]

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In games and sports, an unbalanced advantage intended to even the odds is typically referred to as a handicap. It can come in many forms, including allowing one team to start with more points, or field more players, or have more clock time. In sports lingo, you'd be "agreeing to a handicap".

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